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Born May 18, 1953; got saved at Truett Memorial BC in Hayesville, NC 1959. On rigged ballot which I did not rig got Most Intellectual class of 71, Gaffney High School. Furman Grad, Sociology major but it was little tougher than Auburn football players had Had three dates with beautiful women the summer of 1978. Did not marry any of em. Never married anybody cause what was available was undesirable and what was desirable was unaffordable. Unlucky in love as they say and even still it is sometimes heartbreaking. Had a Pakistani Jr. Davis Cupper on the Ropes the summer of 84, City Courts, Rome Georgia I've a baby sitter, watched peoples homes while they were away on Vacation. Freelance writer, local consultant, screenwriter, and the best damn substitute teacher of Floyd County Georgia in mid 80's according to an anonymous kid passed me on main street a few years later when I went back to get a sandwich at Schroeders. Had some good moments in Collinsville as well. Ask Casey Mattox at www.clsnet.org if he will be honest about it. I try my best to make it to Bridges BBQ in Shelby NC at least four times a year.

Monday, February 01, 2010

Greensboro Lunchcounters, Bama Baptist Jihadist, and JD Salinger

Today is historic day in Civil Rights History, when the Greensboro Four sat down at Woolworth's Lunch Counter and did their chapter that would 10 years later place me on the Bi-Racial Committee at Gaffney Senior High School, paving the way for Sidney Rice.
It made a front page story in NY Times yesterday from which I will link and quote later so come back to this catch all blog.
Excellent documentary last night on same onPBS.org Independent lens for the few of you out there who weren't texting or watching the Lifetime Channel


Also in NY Times story yesterday was link to their rivetting magazine story about a gifted small Town Alabama boy raised and Baptized Southern Baptist; but now one of the most threatening members of Al Qaeda in Somalia.
As David Byrne would ask: "How did he get there?"
Link to follow on that as well.

And JD Salinger died Friday. I had heard about Catcher in the Rye growing up and Miss Chadwick had me read some Kafka and Conrad at Gaffney Senior High School. I grew up thinking there was something little shady about it, it would make me have bad thoughts about girls so as preacher's son tried to keep my eyes on Heaven.
At Furman I got hints of Marshall Frady and learned some other stuff even made a B- in the course on Human Sexuality, but ironically enough Catcher in the Rye didn't register with me till I heard a Baptist Preacher Carlyle Marney talk about what it meant in Gaffney in the Spring of 78, the year Marney died.
I made reference to that meeting and exchange with Marney in my eulogy for my Father in Collinsville in August 1999.

Four page eulogy for Salinger in NY Times, and a great line in there I will share soon here as well.

Salinger Quote:

“Salinger had remarked that he was in this world but not of it,” the statement said. “His body is gone but the family hopes that he is still with those he loves, whether they are religious or historical figures, personal friends or fictional characters.”

Statement from the children of Salinger in the Friday story announcing Salinger's passing.

I read one time he went to a lot of his small adopted hometown HS Basketball games; and later read he was a regular at the Weds evening Pot luck suppers at the local Congregational Church. I think the story was he was particularly fond of the roast beef.




2 Comments:

Blogger 逛街 said...

goodjob!........................................

4:23 PM  
Blogger foxofbama said...

Here is the good quote from NY Times Monday on Greensboro Four:

Of course, since this museum was conceived, civil rights institutions and memorials have been proliferating, but the task of capturing the full scope of the movement seems ever more imposing. As it recedes in time, its history grows not smaller and simpler but grander and more complex. And this museum, in a region where ordinary life was a matter of bitter conflict, looks at the movement not as an uplifting triumph — which it surely was, however imperfect and however incomplete — but as a heroic battle fought through a dark maze of grim restrictions and dangerous confrontations.

8:00 PM  

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